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The Higher Death

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OM
It is mind; it is empty.
It is mind; it is empty.
It is all mind; it is all empty.
All this false being is intrinsically devoid of essence.

There is no “is.”
There is no “is not.”
Every phenomenal thing is trapped between being and non-being for eternity;
It is this neutral ground which holds the key-spark.

From this fundamental truth we can see our own true nature,
As well as that of all sentient beings.
All are the same.
All are naught.

Out of this void rises wisdom and compassion.
With these two-fold wings every being may know the highest peace.
They may transcend pain, and even non-pain.
They may transcend transcendence itself.

But transcending transcendence means nothing to an ordinary sentient being.
Beyond “beyond” is unfathomable.
One’s mind must know its own depths as unfathomable,
And through this see truth.

All that we see is mind, and yet we abide in ignorance.
All that we know is mind, and yet we abide in ignorance.
All that we experience is mind, and yet we abide in cyclic pain and despair and woe.
We ignore this pervasive void of essence, and so cannot see beyond the promise of bliss.

I too, am lost.
All beings are lost, until they taste of the well-spring of infinity.
This may only be found through the path of loss and renunciation.
But who can know that this renunciation is beyond mere possessions or perceptions?

To lose our very being, our souls;
To negate all pain with bliss, and all bliss with equanimity;
To let go of our very instincts of self-perservation, connection, reproduction, sustenance, and being;
To embrace demise and void as though a loving long-lost friend–this is the highest practice.

Find yourself in your Death.
Find Death that transcends the duality of mortal existence.
Seek the ultimate Death who resides at the core of life itself.
She is your lover and guide to a world beyond conception.

But It is still mind, It is still empty.
Yes, It is still mind, It is still empty.
Even here, It is all mind; even now It is all empty.
All this true being is even still devoid of essence.
SWAHA

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The Artful Wisdom of Comedians

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Comedians seem to be more attuned with truth than any act or role in humanity. The truly good comedians possess the wisdom of the philosopher, with the kind of worldly, day-to-day understanding that no philosopher seems to fully grasp, and then, with the creativity of an artist and the confidence of an orator they present their keen and profound insights into the minutia of human existence and what they mean in an entertaining fashion. When i see the comics of Zach Weinersmith (Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal), Allie Brosh (Hyperbole and a Half), and Bill Watterson (Calvin and Hobbes), or the cartoons of Don Hertzfeldt (Rejected Cartoons; Bitter FIlms), or watch the “fake” news of Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart, or listen to the stand-up of George Carlin, Louis C.K., and Mitch Hedberg, I find myself acknowledging truths of human existence that no philosopher, ritual, mythology, book, song, or piece of visual art can so well present to me. Comedians seem to connect to their audience more effectively than (for my money, anyway) any other role or profession. Now of course, comedians have their place: They should not replace literature, philosophy, religion, music, and so forth. But i find it fascinating to see their role in society today. They have never held much of a prominent role in humanity until fairly recently. Court jesters were more of mere performers, and while some philosophers, poets, mystics, and writers have come very close, never before has there simply been a label called “comedian” or “comic” which we’ve given to a person whose sole duty or service is to make people laugh. The greatest of comics (like the ones aforementioned) go well beyond this, and actually give us insights into the human experience. Comedy is truly a great art, if done effectively, and i think it may be the most starkly truth-based creation of humanity yet.
I’m not good at words, but i hope i made my point here well enough.

– J. Ibrahim Abuhamada